Bread Head at J'AI RÊVÉ LE GOÛT DE LA BRIQUE PILÉE

Presentation

Saturday, 15 October 2016 - Sunday, 27 November 2016

CampbellWorks are delighted to be presenting their project Bread Head at The Contemporary Ceramics Centre of La Borne featuring Christine Cynn, Harriet Murray, Valentin Manz & Neil Taylor

 

J'AI RÊVÉ LE GOÛT DE LA BRIQUE PILÉE
 
Curated by: 
SOPHIE AUGER-GRAPPIN AND NATSUKO UCHINO
 
The desire of La Borne Artists in Residence is to launch a debate about the different contemporary ceramics practices, affected as much by aesthetics as by various specific economic issues. This is a double exhibition organised at the same time at the Contemporary Ceramics Centre and ‘La Box’, the gallery of the National Art School of Bourges, and we will be presenting a collection of productions affected by these different realities, timescales and sensibilities. It will attempt to convey the idea of a certain way of life. This debate is based on interviews with different ceramists developed jointly with the sculptor and ceramist Natsuko Uchino.
 
Exhibition from 15 October to 22 November 2016

Private view Saturday 15 October from 6pm to 9pm.

Before the Private View there is the chance to meet the artists at 5pm.

Open every day from 11am to 6pm.
 
 
 
History - The roots of pottery at La Borne
 
La Borne is a hamlet on the outskirts of the towns of Henrichemont and Morogues in the Cher department of central France. Since the 13th century, pottery-making has been recorded in the area, however it was not until the 15th Century that potters were able to master the firing techniques suiting local clay, a stoneware clay fired at 1280°C. When fired at this temperature, the clay becomes watertight. La Borne’s golden age was during the 19th century. There were 21 workshops each one with a master potter, turners and labourers, who kept the “shop” (the term for the potters’ workshops) running. The use of the large-scale hill-climbing kilns was shared. Wares such as salting pots, terrine dishes, milk jugs and chimney pots were all sold throughout the centre and west of France.
The traditional potteries went into decline in the middle of the 20th century, either due to competition from other materials or because the wares no longer were what people were looking for.
 
Although at this time other pottery villages disappeared, La Borne underwent a rebirth. Ceramic artistes such as Jean and Jacqueline Lerat, André Rozay and Vassil Ivanoff came here to learn the secrets of clay from the old potters.
 
Pierre Digan and Pénélope, Jean Linard and Christophe, Anne Kjaersgaard, Jean-Pierre Turpin, Barbara Delfosse. La Borne around1965 (published in Elle Magazine